Category Archives: “Looking Back”

Short’s Corner: “Looking Back”

In the days before the widespread use of the automobile, Conway had a number of neighborhood groceries that were within walking distance of most homes. Numerous children were sent by parents with a handful of money and a shopping list to gather up a few things. Still others, with allowance in hand, made their way down the street for a coke or some candy.

Even after automobiles became more common and Kroger, Safeway, the Mad Butcher and Simon’s became weekly grocery destinations, many still depended on these “corner stores” Continue reading

The Pods: “Looking Back”

Reprinted here by special permission of the author, Cindy Beckman, a retired Conway High School history teacher who writes local history.

Fifty years ago, Conway High School students returned to a new school. Built on Highway 60 on the outskirts of the city, the high school would have a unique design as well as a unique new curriculum.

The groundbreaking for this new $800,000 hexagonal pod-type high school complex was held Continue reading

Wampus Cat? What’s That? “Looking Back”

Today’s column is for Conway residents and newcomers who have often wondered, but were afraid to ask, “What is a Wampus Cat exactly?”

One of my first assignments as a feature writer for the Wampus Cat student newspaper years ago was to write about Wampas Cats in other places. Mind you, this assignment was done in the late 1970s before Google or Wikipedia. But somehow, I found Continue reading

Local Indian Tribes: “Looking Back”

Reprinted here by special permission of the author, Cindy Beckman, a retired Conway High School history teacher who writes local history.

One of the interesting exhibits at the Faulkner County Museum is the Indian exhibit. It includes a vast collection of artifacts, many of which were collected by Fred Wilson, the mail carrier in Greenbrier for a number of years. My grandmother told me they often found arrowheads while farming cotton and put them Continue reading

Kelso-Waddle Blacksmith Shop in Greenbrier: “Looking Back”

Picture: The Kelso-Waddle Blacksmith Shop in Greenbrier in the early 1900s. Clyde Kelso and Tom Waddle are the two men in the middle with rods and horseshoes in their hands. Kelso is sixth from the right holding a horseshoe.

Reprinted here by special permission of the author, Cindy Beckman, a retired Conway High School history teacher who writes local history.

At the turn of the century, every village had a blacksmith shop. Its services were always vitally needed because most communities were agricultural and needed farm implements as well as shoes for their horses. Even the townspeople needed blacksmiths for their horses and buggies as well as Continue reading